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Reader Question:

I have a question regarding how to handle a combative dementia patient. My husband and I care for my 51 year old daughter. She is in her 5th year of dementia and hates bath time and getting re-diapered. She is also getting more and more agitated in general.

We have zero outside help as she has no insurance and so far has been denied any government assistance.

My concerns are for her safety as well as mine… she hits and trys to bite … she poops when she gets excited and angry which is a problem when I have to put the clean diaper on her.

It takes 2 people to get her bathed and dressed and her diaper is soiled by the time I get her “anti-strip pj’s “on her!

She does have a doctor the free clinic at the county hospital system… but I have to figure out a lot of this on my own… should I ask for a mild sedative to use for her bath time… we try to bathe her 2X a day.

Thank you! Sincerely,
Yvonne

 

Hi Yvonne,

When it comes to how to handle a combative dementia patient, I am not a medical professional, so my advice is purely from my experience. I’ll do my best!

Agitation is a very common symptom with dementia. My advice is to look for both clinical and non-clinical solutions.

Non-Clinical Dementia Care

Dementia is scary for the person experiencing decline. As a person who has had a minor stroke, I experienced the tiniest touch of cognitive impairment.

I can remember looking around at my family. My head knew they were important, but I couldn’t remember why. I could see by the looks on their faces that something was wrong with me, but I couldn’t grasp what that might be. The experience was disorienting and terrifying to say the least.

I imagine this is how it is for someone experiencing dementia. So, the goal is to reduce stress and agitation while preserving safety, health and freedom.

Take note of activities that cause agitation. Does your loved one seem more agitated at night (very common) or morning. Is agitation mainly due to a certain task like meals, bathing, or bed?

Once you notice of what triggers agitation, avoid it.

I know I know, no kidding right, but stay with me.

If bath-time stresses your loved one, then consider doing it less frequently (as long as there is not a soiling issue).

Your loved one may have bathed daily for 60 years, but dementia brings many new normals. It could be time for a routine change.

I met a creative woman who COULD NOT get her husband into the shower, but he would sit with her in the hot tube where she could wash him. Small wins.

Maybe showering is out right now, but your loved one would stand for a sponge bath or wipe down with a disposable cloth. This article is about giving bed baths, but many of the same principles apply to dementia bathing.

Dementia care is less about getting the task done and more about making sure your loved one is safe, healthy, and comfortable. If it isn’t really necessary, ask yourself if it must be done.  Creative care is dementia care.

Now, lets address non-negotiable care. You cannot leave a loved one in a soiled adult diaper, but often this is a highly stressful activity for both you and your charge. Try your best to keep the environment calm. You might find that taking breaks between tasks gives you both a minute to compose.

For instance, waiting to re-diaper might give skin a chance to breath and your loved one to relax.

Try putting on a favorite song or show while completing a task that is unpleasant. Trying singing something you both loved to trigger a calmer atmosphere. Make a cold bathroom warm before shower time.

Remember, with dementia care, we go where the patient is. They rarely come to us.

Clinical Dementia Care

Sometimes, no matter how comfortable the environment, your loved one will still experience anxiety, and care will still need to take place.

This is where a close relationship with your physician is a must.

You are not a doctor BUT you are an advocate. This is one of your most important roles. The doctor may spend 10 minutes with a patient, but you see that person all the time.

If something isn’t working in the best interest of your loved one, speak up. If your doctor doesn’t like it, get a second opinion.

I would set an appointment and share your situation with your doctor. A sedative may not be what he or she prescribes. But, there are medication options that might make everyone more comfortable.

I have seen clients who hit and bite transform with the proper medications. This a journey. Meds may need to be adjusted or changed as dementia progresses. Do not hesitate to communicate with your doctor if meds don’t work or results change over time.

If you don’t feel you are getting the proper support from your doctor, request a specialist. Neurologists specialize in conditions that affect the brain. You for sure could use one of these experts in your court.

Support

Dementia care may feel lonely, but you are not alone. Often, it seems the only options are private paid care – like what Green Tree Home Care offers – and government assistance.

Unfortunately, many people fall into a care gap where private pay is out of reach and they don’t qualify for government help.

There is a large number of non-profit organizations that exist to fill in this gap!

For those caring for loved ones with dementia, the Alzheimer’s Association is an amazing resource. There should be one in your area.

In San Diego, where I am based, we have Jewish Family Service. This organization has programs to help older adults with hands on care and care management (you do not have to be Jewish to receive help).

The Parkinson’s Association also has a large presence.

These organizations can help you better understand what resources are available in your area.

There are professionals called Care Managers who help people manage the medical and non-medical ageing landscape.

They generally charge for their services unless they are connected with an organization. But, it may be worth a call to see if one in your local area has any resource ideas.

These professionals are often nurses or social workers and have a strong understanding of the local care landscape.

While there is no simple solution to how to handle a combative dementia patient. Small adjustments can have a big impact!

If you are in the San Diego, Orange County, or Riverside areas of California, please feel free to reach out to use for more help.

 

 

 


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June 26, 2020 Dementia Care0

Can a person die from dementia?

You’ve just found out your loved one has dementia and it’s devastating.

The same loved one who once was energetic and remembered details at the drop of a hat, is now losing these abilities.

And you’re wondering if a person can die from dementia.

The answer is nuanced.

While a person may not die directly from dementia, dementia predisposes them to conditions that can cause death.

That’s what we’ll cover in this post.

Can a person die from dementia?

It is unlikely that a person will die from the early stages of dementia.

Symptoms of early-stage dementia include:

  • Problems remembering recent events like the name of someone they just met.
  • Reduced concentration and focus. This progressively gets worse over time.
  • Increasing confusion.
  • Depression, withdrawal and apathy.
  • Reduced ability to complete daily tasks.

While these are all disturbing symptoms, with daily support, your loved one can continue to function successfully on a daily basis.

As dementia progresses however, you can expect to see your loved one deteriorate and that could then predispose them to other health conditions.

It is important to note that the rate at which dementia progresses is different for each individual.

Late-stage dementia and death

During the later stages of dementia, most people lose the ability to move.

With this impaired ability to move, people in late-stage dementia have an increased risk of developing infections including in their urinary tract, pneumonia (an infection of the lungs), and decubitus ulcers (bedsores).

They may also experience a difficulty eating, swallowing or drinking.

This results in weight loss and malnutrition.

People who are immobile are also at an increased risk for blood clots in their arms and legs.

And all of these health issues could be the cause of death for a person with dementia.

What you can do as a caregiver or loved one

While dementia is progressive and complications arising from it can cause death, it is important to note as a caregiver or loved one, you can do a lot to support and comfort your loved one through this time.

They can continue to play an important role in family life.

For more advice that walks you through taking care of a loved one with dementia, click here.

If you need expert caregivers for your loved one with dementia and you live in the Greater San Diego or Orange County area, Green Tree Home Care is more than happy to help you.

Give us a call at (800) 518-9277 to talk about your needs today. 

 


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January 7, 2020 Dementia Care0

Music therapy for your elderly loved one: how could it help them thrive and age in place?

While listening to music on your own is wonderful, this is not the same as music therapy.

Music therapy is an established health profession in which the therapist uses music to help a person address any physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs.

A music therapist is trained in music therapy and uses it for the well-being of individuals.

You can find them at hospitals, nursing homes, adult day care centers or by calling your nearest healthcare facility and asking about music therapy services.

What are the benefits of music therapy?

There is research that shows that:

  1. Music therapy can reduce anxiety and stress and the effects of these.
  2. Music therapy can improve healing.
  3. If you have a loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease or dementia, music therapy can help them.
  4. It reduces the symptoms of depression.
  5. Music therapy helps with other psychological disorders as well.
  6. Have a loved one struggling with communication? Music therapy can help them communicate better.
  7. Music therapy improves a person’s motivation to become engaged in their treatment.
  8. It can provide an outlet for people to express their feelings and improve communication.
  9. This can be a way to support clients and their families emotionally.

What does music do to the brain?

Music stimulates the brain in ways that other things don’t.

Music has the power to affect a person’s memory and learning.

There have been studies that show that playing music in the background while people learn, helps them remember the information better.

And have you noticed you never forget nursery rhymes that taught you a lesson about life or science?

I learned a song for the names of the planets in our galaxy when I was 10 or 11. To this day, I’m able to recall all the names of the planets simply by singing that song.

Music has a powerful effect on our brains and simple scenarios like the ones I’ve described above demonstrate that.

With music therapy draws on this power to help individuals improve their overall well-being and health.

Who can benefit from music therapy?

Music therapy can benefit your older loved one who has dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease or one who suffers from chronic pain.

Research results and clinical experiences have shown music therapy to be especially helpful to elderly clients who haven’t responded to other types of treatments.

Because of the power of music on the brain-an organ that is affected when a person has dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease-music therapists can draw on this to help your elderly loved one.

So how can a music therapist help my elderly loved one?

A qualified music therapist will assess the needs of your loved one as a first step.

Once they’re able to determine your loved one’s strengths, and specific needs, they come up with an individualized plan for your loved one. This treatment plan will have goals as well as the techniques they will used to help your loved one.

A music therapist may:

  • compose music with your elderly loved one
  • accompany your loved one to a musical experience
  • or provide instruction on how to play an instrument

The specific music therapy techniques will depend on their initial and on-going assessments so it will not look the same for everyone.

If your loved one has Alzheimer’s Disease, dementia or is a chronic pain sufferer, talk to your doctor about a music therapy option.

It could be a way to improve things for your loved one, and possibly, your whole family.

 


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January 3, 2020 Dementia Care0

If you’ve had a loved one who has dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease, then you have probably come across advertisements for brain health supplements.

And even if you don’t have a loved one with any such condition, chances are you have seen those types of ads on late night television.

Is there any truth to it?

Are these brain supplements any good for you?

Can they prevent or cure conditions like dementia?

In today’s post, we’ll explore these questions.

Are brain health supplements good for you?

It can be reassuring when someone tells you they have the cure for a devastating condition.

However, as of this writing, even though there are medications that can deal with some symptoms of Alzheimer’s, none of those drugs cure the disease.

Researchers have received millions of dollars to study these drugs but so far, one thing we’re sure of is that none of them can cure.

Now let’s talk about brain health supplements.

Most supplements in the United States do not have a lot of research behind them.

This also means that these supplements are not approved for what their manufacturers claim they can cure.

And this is where we have to be careful.

These supplements may very well do what they are marketed to do.

However, because they are not regulated, they could contain chemicals that could be downright dangerous.

So be cautious.

The FDA takes action against companies selling supplements said to cure or treat Alzheimer’s

In February of 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted 12 warning letters and 5 advisory letters that they had written to foreign and local companies.

These companies were illegally selling as many as 58 supplements that claimed to prevent, cure or treat Alzheimer’s Disease.

Again, while some of these could have a benefit, nobody knows their effect either in the short-term or the long-term.

And so the FDA had to put a cap on it before it became a safety problem.

It’s important as a caregiver or consumer that you do your research and are not swept up by the claims of some of these companies who clearly do what they’re doing to make a profit.

 

So are brain health supplements bad for you?

At this point, nobody can give a definitive answer because nobody knows.

So do your diligence before buying any such supplements.

 

 


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September 17, 2019 Dementia Care0

Who would think that drinking more tea could improve brain health?

As far-fetched as it sounds, recent research is showing that drinking tea could improve brain health.

There are several studies that point to the impact of tea on human health.

Some of those health benefits include:

  1. Tea has antioxidants. Antioxidants prevent chemicals called free radicals in our bodies from causing damage to our organs.
  2. Tea had less caffeine than coffee. This means it will not affect your sleep as much as coffee does.
  3. Some research studies have shown tea could reduce a person’s risk of heart attack or stroke.
  4. Tea can boost your immune system.

And those are just a few examples of what tea can do for your body.

In this new research, scientists at the National University of Singapore were able to gather data from 36 human subjects that showed that tea can affect brain health.

This is especially interesting, because their results could have implications for people with degenerative brain conditions such as dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease.

Let’s take a look at how to improve your brain health with tea.

Improve your brain health with tea

The research team recruited 36 people who were over the age of 60 for this study.

This same group of researchers had published research earlier that suggested that tea could affect the cognitive or brain health of older people.

The researchers observed and collected data from these people from 2015 to 2018.

The research team found that study participants who had been drinking oolong, green tea or black tea for at least 4 times a week over the last 25 years had better brain arrangements compared to their non-tea drinking counterparts.

The researchers were able to show this using MRI studies.

These better arrangement and connectivity of the brain means that brain signals are transmitted more efficiently.

The participants also had to take neuropsychological tests and the researcher found tea drinkers scored higher on the tests.

Even though we will still need more data to definitively conclude that drinking tea has positive effects on the brain, this research is enough to spark our interest and maybe what you need to get started drinking tea.

You can read the full research study here.

What this could mean for you or your older loved one

On this blog, we are always doing out best to bring you the best ways for older adults to stay healthy and live productive lives.

Apart from all the other fantastic health benefits of tea, this new research is opening up a new area that could help anyone at any age to protect their brain health from an early age.

Even if you’re already over 60, chances are that you will live for another 20 or 30 years with improved medicine and healthcare.

Thus, drinking a cup of your favorite tea at least once a day could be just what you need.

Enjoyed this post?

Share it with someone else looking to improve their brain health.


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August 5, 2019 Dementia Care0

Are brain supplements good for you? Do they work?

Supplements and vitamins are a dime a dozen these days and it can be hard to differentiate what is real from what is not.

This is especially true if you’ve tried to research solutions to help boost your elderly loved one’s brain health.

So which supplements do you trust and which ones are just a fad?

In today’s post, I will go over which brain supplements researchers show to be effective.

Brain supplements are not for everyone

An important note is that while one may enjoy excellent benefits from a supplement person, another person may see none.

This is due to a number of factors.

  • Genetic make-up. Research scientists still discovering that your genetic make-up can affect the efficacy of a drug. There is more and more talk of personalized medicine where treatments are tailored to individuals instead of everyone receiving the same drug.
  • Underlying health issues. Before you start using any supplements, it’s helpful if you could talk to your primary healthcare provider. Supplements still contain organic chemicals interact with the drugs you already take and so may cause you to react adversely or see no benefits.
  • Sometimes, a supplement may only work when the person is deficient in that particular supplement. If you’re not deficient in it, you may see no benefits.

And apart from these, the truth is that certain supplements are hyped by marketing companies; but have no research to back them.

Thus in researching and buying brain supplements, it is important to do your due diligence.

Brain supplements – Results from research

Omega-3 fatty acids, gingko biloba and ashwagandha are a handful of brain supplements that researchers have studied.

Omega-3-Fatty Acids

You will find omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil. According to this study published in Psychopharmacology, older adults with mild cognitive impairment who were given fish oil over a 12-month period showed improved brain function over a similar group of older adults who did not take the supplements.

It’s important to not that while the scientists saw this improvement in people who had mild cognitive impairment, they did not notice any increased benefit with people who did not have brain impairments.

Gingko Biloba

Researchers in this study found the Gingko Biloba benefited people had dementia.

Most people in the study tolerated the drugs well.

Ashwagandha

Ayuverdic medical practitioners (a type of traditional medical system practiced in India) use ashwagandha a lot.

Researchers show that Ashwagandha has effects on the heart, different glands in your body as well as on the brain.

While all of these supplements show positive effects on brain health, researchers still have a long way to go in studying them.

In fact, few negative side effects have been reported for the three supplements I’ve discussed here. Nonetheless, it is always important to check with your doctor or healthcare provider before you start taking a new supplement.

So are brain supplements safe for you?

It depends on many factors but so far, research supports a handful of them.


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May 17, 2019 Dementia Care0

Are you thinking of summertime activities for your loved one with dementia?

Summer is a mere few weeks away.

The kids will be out of school soon and the days will be long and full of sunshine.

If you have a loved one with dementia, you are wondering what activities you can do with them.

You are in luck.

In this post, I will share 10 summertime activities you can do with your loved one to keep them engaged.

Let’s delve right into it.

10 summertime activities for adults with dementia

Reading

Reading is a quiet time activity that works well for people with dementia.

If you know what some of their favorite literature is, this is even more helpful because chances are that they will remember several passages very well.

Reading is also a nice activity to do when those warm summer evenings are winding down.

Music/Dance

Researchers have shown that music therapy is an effective way for dementia patients to interact with the world around them.

Some good old music and dancing could be just what the doctor ordered.

Take the board games outside

Take board games outside for a change.

If there is a board game your loved one played for a long time, chances are that they have “muscle memory” of the game.

They will engage when they play those games.

Hot Tub Fun

If you have a hot tub this could be a fun summertime activity for your loved one as well.

Caution: make sure you or someone is with your loved one as they take a dip in the hot tub to prevent drowning.

Walking/Hiking

If you choose walking or hiking as an activity to do with your loved one, it is important to watch out for your loved one’s energy levels.

If you notice they are too tired when they walk long distances, cut down on the distance but still make it an enjoyable experience.

Take a drive

Have scenic route in your city or state? Taking a drive down on an iconic or scenic route can be a great memory jogger for adults with dementia.

If the memory associated with the route is a good one, this could be a good way to spark conversation.

Watch an old movie

Do you have movies that are a tradition?

If so, summer nights are a great time to binge watch.

Lay in the grass and watch the stars

Summertime is famous for having clear nights.

Thus, these are always a great time to lay in the grass or sit on the porch and watch the stars twinkle.

Go on a picnic

Instead of eating lunch indoors, how about taking lunch outside for a picnic?

Plant a garden

Gardening is yet another great summertime activity to get your loved one involved in.

There is always something to do with a garden and so they will never be a dull moment.

 

Which one of these summertime activity ideas was your favorite?

If you enjoyed this post, consider sharing it with someone else.


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May 14, 2019 Dementia Care0

Family vacation season is upon us!

And perhaps you are thinking about traveling with a loved one who has dementia.

If you have never done this before, it is overwhelming.

However, with the right preparation and resources, you should be able to travel with your loved one.

In this post, I will discuss 8 tips for traveling with a loved one who has dementia.

8 tips for traveling with a loved one who has dementia

First and foremost, you will have to determine if traveling with your loved one will be safe and the best idea for them.

For someone who is in the early stages of dementia, they may be able to handle traveling.

For a more advanced patient however, traveling with them to an unfamiliar location is not advisable.

So determine if they are up for traveling before you make the travel plans.

Contact TSA beforehand

If you have a loved one who is disabled or has dementia, you can contact TSA beforehand and let them know that you have a special situation.

In most cases, they can speed up the check-in process.

Alternatively, you could sign up for a service like TSA Pre-check.

This also gets you through TSA lines quickly and without hassle.

Contact the airline ahead of time

Airlines will also accommodate your needs if you call them ahead of time.

It is not uncommon for airlines to assign special seating and even provide wheelchair transport/assistance for families who need it.

Consider a medical escort service

If it is in your budget, you can consider a medical escort service.

These are caregivers who will travel with your loved one and will help you take care of them on your trip.

Identification

An identification bracelet that has your loved one’s name and who to contact is a must-have when you travel.

You can take it a step further and have name tags sewn into your loved one’s clothing.

Budget for extra time to get to things

If you will need to get places while on vacation, make sure to budget for extra time so you can arrive on time.

This is an especially helpful tip for when you need to catch a plane on time.

Choose a location closer to home

Long travel times will make anyone antsy.

For your loved one with dementia, being confined in a plane for 5 or 6 hours will be uncomfortable.

Choosing a vacation spot that is closer to home will cut down the discomfort.

Carry important documents and medication with you

Carry important medical records and medication with you.

They will still need to take medication on the trip.

And should there be a need to go the the hospital while on vacation, you will be ready.

Once you arrive, help them familiarize themselves with the place

Even though your loved one may not always remember, it is helpful if you orient them to the place one you arrive at the vacation location.

At the very least, show them what is available to them in their room and who they can call for help if they need it.

Closing Thoughts

Traveling with a loved one who has dementia is no easy feat.

But depending on the progression of the disease, it is possible to travel if you plan ahead and use the tips I just shared with you.

If you found this helpful, make sure to share it with someone who needs advice on traveling with a loved one who has dementia.

 


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May 10, 2019 Dementia Care0

Are you caring for a loved one who has recently been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease?

We understand how tough it can be.

Perhaps, you have landed on this page because you are looking for dementia care resources.

You are in the right place.

This post is a compilation of our best posts on dementia care.

In each post, you will gain valuable insights on how best to care for your loved one.

10 dementia care resources for your loved one.

What are the warning signs that signal dementia? Here are 5 warning signs that your loved one may have dementia.

How to keep a loved one engaged when they have Alzheimer’s Disease. How do you communicate with your loved on who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s? What can you do to keep them engaged and involved with everyday life? Learn how to that that in this post.

Dementia comes with personality changes. For a caregiver who has loved with their loved one for a long time, these changes can throw you for a loop. Learn how you can deal with changes you will notice in your loved one with dementia.

One of the hallmarks of dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease is memory loss. This is usually devastating for everyone involved. In this post, we give you 8 tips for helping your loved one who is going through memory loss.

Yes, you can become an expert dementia caregiver. Here is how you can achieve that feat.

One of the best ways to keep your loved one engaged is to get them involved in activities. Here are 5 fun activities that are great for people with dementia.

In a viral YouTube video, an organization called Music & Memory showed how a male Alzheimer’s patient who had been non-verbal came to life after they played music from his younger days.

So how does music therapy work? Help your loved one cope with music therapy.

Nobody likes to be the bearer of bad news. However, it is a reality that disasters happen. Hurricanes, blizzards and fires claim lives and millions of dollars in property each year. Here is how you can help your loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease prepare for a disaster.

For how to keep your loved one safe during fires, check out this post.

And if you are looking for even more tips on how to keep your loved one safe around the house, here are 21 ideas.

Closing Thoughts

There is no denying that taking care of a loved one who has dementia or Alzheimer’s is hard.

In fact, it is possible that in addition to dementia, your loved one has other health issues.

This no doubt compounds matters even more.

We want you to know that we see you. And we celebrate you.

And these dementia care resources are our way of supporting you on the journey.

If you need expert home care services for your loved ones, Green Tree Home Care is just a phone dial away.

Found this list helpful? Share it with somebody looking for dementia care resources.

 


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March 29, 2019 Dementia Care0

Care-giving is difficult.

It becomes even more difficult when you have a loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease.

No matter who you are, Alzheimer’s Disease always throws people for a loop.

How do I communicate with him/her if they can’t remember me?

How do I keep them involved in activities?

How do we interact?

These are all valid questions that have no easy answers.

However, it is possible to keep to your loved one engaged even though they might have Alzheimer’s.

So how do we go about that?

In a survey that was put out by Self Magazine just last year, caregivers were asked to share their best tips on keeping their loved ones with Alzheimer’s engaged.

They shared the following tips.

How to keep a loved one engaged when they have Alzheimer’s Disease

Help them do the things they have loved to do for a long time

Thanks to a part of our brains known as the hippocampus, there are activities that we do automatically throughout life. This is true even for people with Alzheimer’s Disease. Chances are that your loved one still remembers how to dance, sing or play their favorite board game. They may not be able to explain why they are able to it; but it still stands that they can.

If you notice that they are still able to perform some of their favorite activities, create opportunities that allow them to be involved in those activities.

Modify activities they enjoy so they do so in a safe manner

For certain activities, it is possible that your loved one will not be able to carry them out in the same manner as they used to. In fact, in some instances, it may be unsafe for them to carry out those activities.

If this is the case, you will need to find ways to adapt the activity so that they can still participate in a safe manner.

Find out what goals they have and help them accomplish them

Has your loved one allowed a dream or goal they have always had to slip out?

Perhaps they have always wanted to visit a particular place or see someone in concert?

Help them fulfill that goal.

Help your loved one connect with other people with Alzheimer’s Disease

It is likely that your city has a meetup or community event for people with Alzheimer’s.

You may even find that the group like this is helpful to you as a caregiver.

Don’t force any activity on your loved one

If they don’t want to engage in a particular activity, don’t force your loved one.

It is always best to find activities they are interested in and help them be involved that way.

Help them exercise whatever cognitive ability they have left

If there are skills that have not been impacted by the disease, help your loved one exercise those.

It will give them a sense of purpose.

Allow them to help with household chores they are comfortable with

If they can help you put the dishes away, let them!

Those moments are always a great time to get them to participate in a family activity while helping them maintain a sense of purpose.

Read aloud together

Read aloud with your loved one. You might even find that reading material from their earlier days will spark excitement and conversation.

Keep trying

You haven’t yet found what will help your loved one engage?

Don’t worry. Keep trying new things each day. Listen to them when they speak. See what they already gravitate towards.

And then use that information to help them engage in life.

 

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease is not an easy road for anyone to travel. These tips were shared by caregivers who have already walked the road. Tailor them to your experience and watch your loved one begin to engage.

If you found this post helpful, consider sharing it with someone else looking for tips on how to help their loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease engage.


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